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© Don Dudenbostel

© Don Dudenbostel

Don Dudenbostel | Collodion and X-Ray Photographs

Don Dudenbostel continues to work his photography from every angle-from old-style collodion photographic prints--printed on glass in the style and chemical dangers of the this 19th-century printing technique--to X-Ray photographs printed on an x-ray machine he built for this purpose, to palladium prints made from his x-ray images.  All of that as well as documentary photography, Popcorn Sutton, the East Tennessee icon of moonshine whiskey, is the latest subject of his documentary work, plus a series on snake handlers.  This entire exhibit is a mini-retrospective of Dudenbostel's range of photographic art.  He is one of the few photographers who continue to work with traditional methods such as the darkroom, but he also relishes historic techniques, all of it focused on East Tennessee.


© Cynthia Tollefsrud

© Cynthia Tollefsrud

Cynthia Tollefsrud | New Paintings on a Theme

Cynthia Tollefsrud chooses stylized figures that live and breathe the narratives she places them in her painstaking canvases.  Her paintings tell the tales of muses and ideas that speak to contemporary human foibles and charms that are an integral part of human experience.  The three muses on the three canvases she is presenting are a preview of an exhibit she will bring to The Arts Company in 2015.  The figures are elegant, playful, and stylized musical muses that suggest a passionate engagement in making music.  Her narrative stems from the gestural expressiveness of the joy of making music.  These are literally musical muses at work.  Their job is to engage us in the sheer joy of music.  


© Leonard Piha

© Leonard Piha

Leonard Piha | New Paintings

Leonard Piha is a signature Arts Company artist—well trained with a master's degree from Cranbrook Academy, and with a devotion to creating art from what matters to him in his everyday life. He builds and paints art every day.  That is who he is and what he does.  

Everything in his environment influences him and becomes part of his work sooner or later--from hammers, shoes, hats, tables, his wife, himself, his family, his Jewish heritage through his own contemporary lens, and so on.  He builds his canvases and then begins to paint his visual thoughts du jour.  Tracking his work from year to year is an adventure for anyone interested in seeing an artist transform everyday life into art.  Every image is fresh, original, and rigorously specific.  The proliferation of tangible objects and perspectives embedded in his personal life lead ultimately to a distinctive visual litany that expresses what this artist knows, feels, and observes about his life.